Y9: Wider Reading Book Reviews

Dear Y9

I hope that you are continuing to enjoy your wider reading. Please post your reviews here and have a read of the recommendations to help you decide what to read next….

Thank you Y9

Mrs Morgan

 

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5 Responses to Y9: Wider Reading Book Reviews

  1. Cassidy Blake says:

    A Boy Called Hope – Lara Williamson

    A Boy Called Hope is a rather moving story about a young boy (Dan Hope) and his journey to find his dad. Dan’s dad left the family heart broken when Dan was very little however Dan is recently starting to feel the absence of his father. As the boy begins the search to be with his dad again, obstacles are throw in his way which makes the challenge harder. This story is full of mixed emotions and it is a great read for most ages. This book will give a great impact on young readers and show them situations some people actually have to live with. It is a very realistic storyline and I feel like most people will find this story really heart warming. A Boy Called Hope is a real page-turner and I would highly recommend you read it. All Dan wants is his dad to love him…

  2. Cassidy Blake says:

    A Boy Called Hope – Lara Williamson

    A Boy Called Hope is a rather moving story about a young boy (Dan Hope) and his journey to find his dad. Dan’s dad left the family heart broken when Dan was very little however Dan is recently starting to feel the absence of his father. As the boy begins the search to be with his dad again, obstacles are throw in his way which makes the challenge harder. This story is full of mixed emotions and it is a great read for most ages. This book will give a great impact on young readers and show them situations some people actually have to live with. It is a very realistic storyline and I feel like most people will find this story really heart warming. A Boy Called Hope is a real page-turner and I would highly recommend you read it. All Dan wants is his dad to love him…

  3. Annelise Brundell says:

    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

    The curious incident of the dog in the night-time is a murder mystery, which is not usually my preference, however, I love the way this book is written, focusing on the mind of a fifteen-year-old boy as he tries to find out who killed his neighbor’s dog. Christopher is a complex character who is highly intelligent, yet is easily distressed and finds it hard to read people’s emotions. I feel this book is definitely a page-turner and the story-line develops in a major plot twist, leading Christopher closer to the truth than he ever thought he would get. Personally, I recommend this book to young adults and teenagers as the main character’s (Christopher’s) mind-set is unique and complex. The ending is momentous, earth-shattering and completely unexpected yet it all ties perfectly together. I absolutely love this book and I don’t look at things the same way after reading it, it tells such and individual story, yet, somehow, connects with anyone who reads it.

  4. Beryl says:

    Killing Honour – Bali Rai

    Killing Honour is a modern crime novel. Not something I would normally pick up but the chilling cover drew me in.
    Sat Kooner is an average Leicester teenager; he doesn’t care for his family’s Sikh tradition or anything like that – all he cares about at the moment is his social life, his football and his girlfriend. That all changes when his sister, Jas supposedly runs off with a Muslim man. Sat’s family try hard to hide it, as it was a disgrace for his family. But Sat knows better and tries to find the truth.
    I think this book is very good as it tackles very complex issues in a very personal level. It talks about honour and honour killings in the Punjabi/ Sikh community. This book was an eye opener for me as before I didn’t know about honour killings. Now I know there is a deeper layer to lots of Sikh families that most people don’t see.

  5. Ruth ;) says:

    Book review – The Wearle by Chris d’Lacey
    The Wearle is the first book in the Erth Dragons series. It is about a group of dragons (a Wearle) which has come from the dragon world of Ki:mera to Erth (the dragon word for Earth) to search for a different Wearle. The first Wearle, led by a dragon named Greffan, went to Erth to explore and breed. When no contact came back to Ki:mera, another group of dragons went to Erth to find them. They established their own Wearle and territories on Erth. One of the dragons in this Wearle was a young blue named Gabrial.
    Near the Wearle’s territories is a village which the dragons call the Hom. The Hom (or The Kaal Tribe) is a village of people who live in fear of the fiery monsters which hunt beyond the Scorch Line. The story really kicks off when Ren, a boy from the village, discovers and befriends, a young Wearling (baby dragon), a drake who he names ‘Pupp’.
    I really like this book as there are so many twists in the plot and it’s hard to know who you can trust. The characters are intriguing and there are three out looks on the situation – the dragon’s view (the Hom are stupid and insignificant and must be burned if they cross the Scorch line), the Kaal Tribe view (the ‘skalers’ are horrible and have stolen their mountains) and Ren’s view (the dragons aren’t as dangerous or evil as people think. The story works itself up to a complicated and dramatic climax. It is one of the best books I have ever read and is by the best author in the world EVER (no arguments) and I strongly recommend EVERYONE should read it. However, it might make more sense if you read the Last Dragon Chronicles by the same author first. The first one is The Fire Within.

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